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The Emily Barker Band
plus Pete Roe

Tuesday 7th November 2017

The Bullingdon, 162 Cowley Road, Oxford, OX4 1UE

Doors 7.30 pm
Tickets £13 in advance, £15 on the night
Buy tickets . . .
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Due to sound check restriction the door time indicates the earliest opportunity we can give access to the venue. Live music will start 20-30 minutes after the door open time.
It is largely thanks to John Peel that Emily Barker first settled in the UK. After leaving home (Australia) to see the world, she ended up on the Cambridge folk scene, and formed the band, The Low Country. Just as she was considering resuming her studies back home, Peel started playing them on Radio 1, so she stayed. Her music has since been described as “heartfelt songwriting… bridging the gap between folk, country and Fleetwood Mac” (The Times), “ambitious and beautifully wrought” (Q), while the Guardian applauds her “gift for great melodies.”

This gift has not gone unnoticed by film makers, resulting in Barker penning and performing theme songs for award-winning television dramas Wallander and The Shadow Line as well as an entire musical score for Jake Gavin’s poignant and well-received 2015 road movie, Hector, starring Peter Mullan.

In recent years Barker has made herself at home in Nashville and Memphis, performing, collaborating and basking in musical history. In Nashville in 2014 she formed the trio Applewood Road with Tennessee-based songwriters Amber Rubarth and Amy Speace. Their eponymous LP was recorded at Welcome to 1979 studio in Nashville. ‘Applewood Road’ was a regular on best-of-2016 album lists, they toured extensively, played Glastonbury and Cambridge Folk Festivals and made numerous television appearances.
Her latest album ‘Sweet Kind of Blue’ was recorded in June 2016, at the legendary Sam Phillips Recording Service in Memphis, where the tapes have been rolling since 1960. Phillips opened his dream studio (he called it “the Cape Canaveral of studios”) after he and his artists Elvis, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and B B King outgrew Sun Studio, a few blocks away.

The stars were perfectly aligned for the Memphis sessions. Barker brought her songs, her guitar, that cathedral of a voice and her irrepressible freewheeling spirit. The result is an intoxicating blend of Barker penned songs about loves lost, heartrending humanity, the rush of the road trip and the sheer glory of a new love. The first single, ‘Sister Goodbye’, is a soulful tribute to one of Barker’s guitar-slinging heroes, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, while the title track, ‘Sweet Kind of Blue’ captures the beautiful urgency of missing a new lover. Its name, says Barker, “also nods to the record’s blues elements, with blue-eyed soul being the ’60s term for white artists performing rhythm and blues”. But the making of ‘Sweet Kind of Blue’ is a love story in itself, between Barker and Memphis.
Pete Roe is the multi instrumentalist/vocalist, known and remarked upon, as the live and studio stalwart in Laura Marling’s Band. Being also a paid up member of the London Folk scene, Pete released an EP with Communion during his sideman life. But it was in March 2011 when Pete was invited on infamous Railroad Revival Tour with Mumford & Sons – as well as the likes of Old Crow Medicine Show and Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, that he met Nashville’s Ross Holmes & Matt Menefee who had come along for the ride and subsequently went for another ride to Scotland to record with Pete.